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The Hunting Snake by Judith Wright (ESL differentiated task)

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In the poem ‘The Snake Hunter’ Judith Wright describes the reactions of the travelers in the line ‘_________________________________________________________________’ . ‘Froze’ suggests that the both the speaker of the poem and the person/s accompanying her __________________________ because __________________________________________________________. ‘Reeling’ to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that ________________________________________ . In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ and ‘tongue-flickering’ implying that _________________________________________________________.  The third line of the second stanza  ‘ the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of ______________________________________________ . This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who ‘lost breath to watch him pass’, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level _________________. On another level__________________________________. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because ____________________ . Here Wright conveys her sense of _____________ which is evoked in the line ________________________ . In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake ‘ ______________________’. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line ‘ ________________________________’ which suggests that _________________________. I find this poem to rather appealing because _________________________________________.

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6 thoughts on “The Hunting Snake by Judith Wright (ESL differentiated task)

  1. The Hunting Snake by Judith Wright
    In the poem ‘The Hunting Snake’ Judith Wright describes the reaction of the travelers in the line ‘we walked, and froze half-through a pace’. ‘Froze suggests that the both the speaker of the poem and the person/s accompanying her stopped suddenly because they were surprised. ‘Reeling’ to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that the snake gets fear of the speaker and her companion. In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ and ‘tongue-flickering’ implying that the snake try to change direction quickly because he is determined to stay safe. The third line of the second stanza ‘the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of the beautiful skin of the snake. This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who ‘lost breath to watch him pass’, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level the speaker and her companion were scared. On another level, they were alternate looking at the beauty of the snake. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because they were in admiration of the snake beauty. Here Wright conveys her sense of wonder which is evoked in the line ‘our eyes went with him as he went’ which is the last line of the third stanza. In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake ‘was gone’. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line ‘we took a deeper breath of day’ which suggests that they were completely wrapped up in the snake that they forgot to breathe. I find this poem to rather appealing because it insane that snakes attack people without reasons.

  2. THE HUNTING SNAKE
    In the poem “The hunting snake” Judith Wright describes the reactions of the travelers in the line “we walked, and froze half-through a pace”. “Froze” suggests that the both speaker and the person accompanying her suddenly stopped, because snake went reeling by. “Reeling” is used to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that snake was also moving, and reeling is the way snake moves. In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ and “tongue-flickering” implying that the snake was also scared, and was tongue-flickering her tongue to smell the way. The third line of the second stanza ‘the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of diamonds, something that is very expensive. Also it brings to the mind the image of the snake, its decoration. This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who “lost breath to watch him pass”, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level it is used to show the reader that people got really scared. On another level it can be true, when something scary happens you try not to breath, like this would help you avoid the snake, or something scary. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because they were waiting for the snake to pass. Here Wright conveys her sense of terror which is evoked in the line “fled living from his fierce intent”. In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake “Cold, dark and splendid he was gone”. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line “We took a breath of the day” which suggests that the snake passed, and they are not scared anymore, so they can take a good breath. I find this poem to rather appealing because everything ended good, snake just passed and no one had any trouble. Happy end.

  3. The Hunting Snake by Judith Wright
    In the poem “The Hunting Snake” Judith Wright describes the reactions of the travelers in the line ‘We walked, and froze half-through a pace’. ‘Froze’ suggests that the both the speaker of the poem and the person/s accompanying her suddenly stopped because they experience fear, they were also extremely scared and had no clue of what they could do at that time. ‘Reeling’ to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that the snake is moving rapidly from side to side, also scared/shocked of what he had just saw. In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ implying that the snake didn’t want to look at the speaker of the poem and her companion. The snake wanted to escape and leave that area as fast as possible. It also refers to his determination to get to safety quickly. Also the speaker of the poem mentioned “tongue-flickering”, which guides the snake and helps it to move faster. In the second line of the second stanza the speaker of the poem it says “he quested through the parting grass”, personification is used. Wright is giving the snake a gender, in this case, male. The third line of the second stanza ‘the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of beauty. It is comparing the snake with jewelry and the sun shining. This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who ‘lost breath to watch him pass’, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level the speaker of the poem and her companion are frightened because they thought that the snake was going to attack and kill them. On another level they were amazed, admiring how beautiful the snake was. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because of how fast the snake escaped, he fled extremely rapidly. Here Wright conveys her sense of thinking which is evoked in the line “We scarcely thought; still as we stood”, which suggests that the speaker of the poem and her companion could barely have an idea of what had just happened to them. In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake ‘was gone; into the grass that hid his prey’. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line ‘we took a deeper breath of the day looked at each other, and went on’ which suggests that they were recovered from the shock they had just suffered, they also made sure that both of them were fine and continued their path. I find this poem to rather appealing because it suggests that snakes flee from people when they are scared rather them attacking them, which doesn’t often happen in real life.

  4. In the poem ‘The hunting snake’ Judith Wright describes the reactions of the travelers in the line ‘were frozen of scare or they thought it was beautiful but it would be scared because most people are scared for snakes’ . ‘Froze’ suggests that the both the speaker of the poem and the person/s accompanying her are scared you scream or stand still for a time because he is searching for food and some people are scared if they bite them. ‘Reeling’ to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that the snake is searching for footsteps of animals. In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ and ‘tongue-flickering’ implying that the snake is searching for clues for food. The third line of the second stanza ‘the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of the snake has a shiny skull his skin is kind if lather but more shiny. This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who ‘lost breath to watch him passes, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level scared that the snake will bite them. On another level thinking that its beautiful. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because they were scared . Here Wright conveys her sense of being scared of getting hurt which is evoked in the line cold dark and splendid . In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake ‘disappeared it went away’. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line ‘we took a deep breath of day’ which suggests that that they were so scared they had to take a deep breath. I find this poem to rather appealing because actually I don’t know what to like about this poem it only goes about fear but if you don’t do anything to the snake it won’t hurt you.

  5. The Hunting Snake by Judith Wright
    In the poem ‘The Hunting Snake’ Judith Wright describes the reactions of the travelers in the line ‘we walk, and froze half-through a pace’. ‘Froze’ suggests that the both the speaker of the poem and the person/s accompanying her were stop with no movement because they see great black snake went reeling in front of them. ‘Reeling’ to describe the actions of the snake conveys the impression that the snake experienced fear as well as the speaker but their responses are very different. In the second stanza the actions of the snake are further depicted when she writes ‘head-down’ and ‘tongue-flickering’ implying that the determination of the snake to stay save and try to change direction quickly. The third line of the second stanza ‘the sun glazed his curves of diamond scale’ brings to mind the image of the snake skin pattern shines. This is followed up by the reactions of the walkers who ‘lost breath to watch him pass’, and can be initially interpreted on two levels. On one level the speaker and the person accompanying her here scared. On another level they were looking at the beauty of the snake. The tone shifts slightly in the third stanza and it becomes clear that the reason for the loss of breath expressed in the previous stanza is because the speaker and the person accompanying her were scared and wondered. Here Wright conveys her sense of wondering about the snake but they don’t actually have time to think about it which is evoked in the line ‘what track he followed, what small food fled living from his fierce intent, we scarcely thought’. In the final stanza of the poem, the moment finds a resolve when the snake ‘was gone into the grass that hid his prey’. The reactions of the travelers are express in the line ‘looked at each other, and went on’ which suggests that they were shocked with these experience and check that each other is okay and make sure that what was just happen is real. I find this poem to rather appealing because it turns out that the snake did not attack the speaker but instead back to his habitat.

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